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Building on common desire for better tribal-state governmental relationships : 2002 Four Corners Institute for Tribal-State Relations Kozak, Jim ; White, Mary E

By: Contributor(s): Publication details: Transportation Research Record, 2003Description: nr 1848, s. 114-7Subject(s): Bibl.nr: VTI P8169:2003 Ref ; VTI P8167Location: Abstract: Overcoming 500 years of fractious relations between tribal and nontribal cultures and governments is an endeavor not easily achieved in America, nor is it one that has always been marked by steady progress. Interpretations of tribal sovereignty have been long disputed. In the past 30 years, this often-debated concept has become an issue of great importance to state and federal governments. Differences of opinion still exist over the impact of tribal sovereignty on policies, procedures, or protocol. However, state and federal policy makers have begun to view the tribes as independent entities entitled to due consideration and an appropriate cultural sensitivity. All branches and levels of governments--including tribal ones--struggle to define mutual areas of responsibility, communication, and cooperation. Decision makers from state, federal, and tribal governments have had some opportunities to share experiences and information in the past. But this practice is still a work in progress despite the most sincere wishes for a better outcome by those participating on a policy level. The common desire of these parties is that intergovernmental relations become more symbiotic and less adversarial, as cooperation can facilitate the mutual interests of all. Accomplishing this task in ways that do not threaten tribal sovereignty is difficult. The 2002 Four Corners Institute for Tribal-State Relations concept is covered along with its participants, methodology, results, limitations, and recommendations for further research. New methodology will be discussed including the remote venue, Native Americans as facilitators, participants as fellows, and the method for choosing format and discussion topics.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Overcoming 500 years of fractious relations between tribal and nontribal cultures and governments is an endeavor not easily achieved in America, nor is it one that has always been marked by steady progress. Interpretations of tribal sovereignty have been long disputed. In the past 30 years, this often-debated concept has become an issue of great importance to state and federal governments. Differences of opinion still exist over the impact of tribal sovereignty on policies, procedures, or protocol. However, state and federal policy makers have begun to view the tribes as independent entities entitled to due consideration and an appropriate cultural sensitivity. All branches and levels of governments--including tribal ones--struggle to define mutual areas of responsibility, communication, and cooperation. Decision makers from state, federal, and tribal governments have had some opportunities to share experiences and information in the past. But this practice is still a work in progress despite the most sincere wishes for a better outcome by those participating on a policy level. The common desire of these parties is that intergovernmental relations become more symbiotic and less adversarial, as cooperation can facilitate the mutual interests of all. Accomplishing this task in ways that do not threaten tribal sovereignty is difficult. The 2002 Four Corners Institute for Tribal-State Relations concept is covered along with its participants, methodology, results, limitations, and recommendations for further research. New methodology will be discussed including the remote venue, Native Americans as facilitators, participants as fellows, and the method for choosing format and discussion topics.

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