The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

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Ultrasonic inspection of bridge hanger pins Graybeal, BA ; Walther, RA ; Washer, GA

By: Contributor(s): Publication details: Transportation Research Record, 2000Description: nr 1697, s. 19-23Subject(s): Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1697Location: Abstract: Ultrasonic inspection is currently one of the most common and reliable methods used in the inspection of hanger pins in pin-and-hanger bridge structures. Recently, a pin-and-hanger connection on a heavily traveled truck route in the Midwest showed visual indications of being deficient. Field contact ultrasonic inspections were performed on the remaining pin connections. The field inspections indicated that a number of the pins contained cracks or significant wear grooves at the pin shear planes, or both. These pins were replaced and sent to the Federal Highway Administration's Nondestructive Evaluation Validation Center for further testing in an ultrasonic immersion tank. The results of the contact and immersion tank ultrasonic studies were nearly identical. Both methods found two pins that contained transverse cracks at the level of a shear plane, with one these cracks encompassing a majority of the pin cross section. Clearly, for the conditions found in the study, field contact ultrasonics can accurately locate defects in hanger pins.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
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Ultrasonic inspection is currently one of the most common and reliable methods used in the inspection of hanger pins in pin-and-hanger bridge structures. Recently, a pin-and-hanger connection on a heavily traveled truck route in the Midwest showed visual indications of being deficient. Field contact ultrasonic inspections were performed on the remaining pin connections. The field inspections indicated that a number of the pins contained cracks or significant wear grooves at the pin shear planes, or both. These pins were replaced and sent to the Federal Highway Administration's Nondestructive Evaluation Validation Center for further testing in an ultrasonic immersion tank. The results of the contact and immersion tank ultrasonic studies were nearly identical. Both methods found two pins that contained transverse cracks at the level of a shear plane, with one these cracks encompassing a majority of the pin cross section. Clearly, for the conditions found in the study, field contact ultrasonics can accurately locate defects in hanger pins.

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