The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

Normal view MARC view

Increased bicycle helmet use in Sweden : needs and possibilities Sixten Nolén

By: Series: Linköping University medical dissertation ; 857 | Publication details: Linköping Linköping University, Division of Social Medicine and Public Health Science, Department of Health and Society 2004Description: 134 sISBN:
  • 9173738328
Subject(s): Other classification:
Online resources: Bibl.nr: VTI 2004.0657Location: Dissertation note: Diss. Linköping : Linköping University, 2004 Summary: Background: From the perspective of what is called "vision zero" in Sweden, fatalities and injuries among bicyclists are unacceptable. Despite that, bicyclists constitutes approximately one third of all road user inpatients in Swedish hospitals, which is about the same proportion seen for drivers and passengers of motor vehicles. There are too many bicycle-related head injuries, but the risk of such traumas could be reduced considerably by the use of helmets. Bicycle helmet wearing can be increased by voluntary means, for instance by long-term community-based helmet promotion programs. However, the best effect has been achieved by combining promotion with a compulsory helmet law for all bicyclists, as has been done in Australia, New Zealand, and North America Aim: The general aim of the research underlying this dissertation was to provide further information about the need for increased bicycle helmet use in Sweden, and to determine what measures can lead to more widespread helmet wearing. The four papers included addressed two main questions: (1) What is the need for increased helmet wearing among different categories of bicyclists in Sweden? (2) Is a non-compulsory local bicycle helmet law a realistic alternative to a mandatory helmet law for all bicyclists? Materials and methods: Observational studies of helmet use by bicyclists in Sweden were conducted once a year (average n = 37,031/year) during the period 1988-2002 (paper I). The general trend in observed helmet wearing in different categories of bicyclists was analyzed by linear regression, and the results were used to predict future trends in helmet wearing. Three studies (papers II-IV) were also performed to evaluate a non-compulsory local bicycle helmet "law" in Motala municipality during the study period 1995 to 1998 (papers II-IV). This law was introduced in 1996 and applies specifically to school children (ages 6-12 years), although the intention is to increase helmet use among all bicyclists. Adoption of the law was accompanied by helmet promotion activities. In one of the studies in the evaluation, written material and in-depth interviews (n=8) were analyzed qualitatively to describe the process and structure of development of the Motala helmet law. The other two studies used a quasi-experimental design to assess the impact of the helmet law: one comprised annual observations of helmet wearing among bicyclists in Motala (average n=2,458/year) and control areas (average n=17,818/year); and the other included questionnaire data on attitudes, beliefs, and self-reported behavior of school children in Motala (n=1,277) and control areas (n=2,198). The average response rate was 72.8%.
Item type: Dissertation
Holdings
Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut Available

Diss. Linköping : Linköping University, 2004

Background: From the perspective of what is called "vision zero" in Sweden, fatalities and injuries among bicyclists are unacceptable. Despite that, bicyclists constitutes approximately one third of all road user inpatients in Swedish hospitals, which is about the same proportion seen for drivers and passengers of motor vehicles. There are too many bicycle-related head injuries, but the risk of such traumas could be reduced considerably by the use of helmets. Bicycle helmet wearing can be increased by voluntary means, for instance by long-term community-based helmet promotion programs. However, the best effect has been achieved by combining promotion with a compulsory helmet law for all bicyclists, as has been done in Australia, New Zealand, and North America
Aim: The general aim of the research underlying this dissertation was to provide further information about the need for increased bicycle helmet use in Sweden, and to determine what measures can lead to more widespread helmet wearing. The four papers included addressed two main questions: (1) What is the need for increased helmet wearing among different categories of bicyclists in Sweden? (2) Is a non-compulsory local bicycle helmet law a realistic alternative to a mandatory helmet law for all bicyclists?
Materials and methods: Observational studies of helmet use by bicyclists in Sweden were conducted once a year (average n = 37,031/year) during the period 1988-2002 (paper I). The general trend in observed helmet wearing in different categories of bicyclists was analyzed by linear regression, and the results were used to predict future trends in helmet wearing. Three studies (papers II-IV) were also performed to evaluate a non-compulsory local bicycle helmet "law" in Motala municipality during the study period 1995 to 1998 (papers II-IV). This law was introduced in 1996 and applies specifically to school children (ages 6-12 years), although the intention is to increase helmet use among all bicyclists. Adoption of the law was accompanied by helmet promotion activities. In one of the studies in the evaluation, written material and in-depth interviews (n=8) were analyzed qualitatively to describe the process and structure of development of the Motala helmet law. The other two studies used a quasi-experimental design to assess the impact of the helmet law: one comprised annual observations of helmet wearing among bicyclists in Motala (average n=2,458/year) and control areas (average n=17,818/year); and the other included questionnaire data on attitudes, beliefs, and self-reported behavior of school children in Motala (n=1,277) and control areas (n=2,198). The average response rate was 72.8%.

Powered by Koha