The VTI National Transport Library Catalogue

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Particulate matter 2.5 : Next challenge for transportation conformity Makler, Jonathan

By: Publication details: Transportation Research Record, 2004Description: nr 1880, s. 71-6Subject(s): Bibl.nr: VTI P8167:1880; VTI P8169:2004Location: Abstract: For transportation planners, the promulgation of a new national ambient air quality standard for 2.5-micron particulate matter (PM2.5) in July 1997 will culminate approximately in December 2005. That is the time, one year after the expected date for designation of new PM2.5 nonattainment areas, when conformity determinations corresponding to the new standard will be due. Because PM2.5 is significantly different from pollutants with which most transportation planners have had experience (ozone and its associated precursors), this discussion attempts to present a useful explanation of PM2.5 science, the role and contribution of mobile source emissions, the types of probable control measures, and, most important, the implications of this for transportation planning. Although only 10% of PM2.5 emissions come from on-road mobile sources, nonattainment status and the transportation conformity requirement in particular will have specific implications for transportation planners. Representatives of prospective nonattainment areas, especially those without previous experience with nonattainment or conformity, may benefit from several recommendations for preparatory efforts drawn from the experiences of conformity veterans around the country.
Item type: Reports, conferences, monographs
Holdings
Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut Available
Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut Available

For transportation planners, the promulgation of a new national ambient air quality standard for 2.5-micron particulate matter (PM2.5) in July 1997 will culminate approximately in December 2005. That is the time, one year after the expected date for designation of new PM2.5 nonattainment areas, when conformity determinations corresponding to the new standard will be due. Because PM2.5 is significantly different from pollutants with which most transportation planners have had experience (ozone and its associated precursors), this discussion attempts to present a useful explanation of PM2.5 science, the role and contribution of mobile source emissions, the types of probable control measures, and, most important, the implications of this for transportation planning. Although only 10% of PM2.5 emissions come from on-road mobile sources, nonattainment status and the transportation conformity requirement in particular will have specific implications for transportation planners. Representatives of prospective nonattainment areas, especially those without previous experience with nonattainment or conformity, may benefit from several recommendations for preparatory efforts drawn from the experiences of conformity veterans around the country.

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